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Glencroft launches unique Yorkshire-made hand-knit yarn

MADE IN YORKSHIRE: Clapdale hand-knit yarn, made from the wool above, sourced from sheep within 5 miles of Glencroft.

 

Six months on from announcing its ‘Farm to Yarn’ Clapdale Wool Project, Glencroft has launched a fully traceable hand-knit yarn made in Yorkshire.

 

The project, which was masterminded by the countrywear clothing brand’s owner, Edward Sexton and was part-funded by the Yorkshire Dales National Park’s Sustainability Fund, was born out of a desire to support Yorkshire farmers in getting more value for their wool.

 

Commenting, Edward said: “Too often we hear of farmers who have to send the wool sheared from their sheep to landfill because there just isn’t any other economical use for it. As avid supporters and users of British Wool, this simply didn’t seem right.

 

“The £5,000 grant from the Yorkshire Dales National Park’s Sustainability Fund helped us to kick-start our ‘farm to yarn’ project, allowing us to take fleeces from farms within a 5-mile radius to us and transform them into a truly unique Yorkshire-made hand-knit yarn.”

 

To ensure they made the best possible yarn, Glenrcoft brought together a team of British wool and fashion design experts from The Wool Company and KnitLab North to advise on the project, making use of local sheep breeds including the traditional Dalesbred, Teeswater, Blue Faced Leicester and the more modern Texel.

FARM TO YARN: (l-r) Zoe Fletcher and Maria Benjamin of The Flock, father and son farmers duo John and William Dawson with Edward Sexton, owner of clothing brand Glencroft.

 

Half a ton of fleece was gathered by Edward from local farms including Dawsons of Bleak Bank and Whitakers of Bowsber Farm in Clapham, which was processed in Bradford where it was weighed, washed and scoured. The wool was then carded in Bingley, before going on to Shipley to be spun.

 

The scouring process removed 234 kgs of mainly organic matter with a further 50 kgs of wool lost to ‘noil’ during carding. This by-product is made up of fibres that are too short for spinning and, not one to waste anything, Glencroft has recycled it, donating it to local crafters as felt and to a company for use as padding for Viking shields in reenactments.

SPINNING: Clapdale wool being spun in Yorkshire on state-of-the-art machines.

Half of the wool was spun into cones for use on knitting machines which KnitLab North is testing on knitwear designs custom-made for Glencroft. The Clapdale Wool Collection is expected to be launched later this year.

 

The remaining yarn was split into two, with 150 kgs spun into 100g hanks of wool for hand-knitting, which has been tested by a local retired knitting shop owner Sandra Oakeshott who used to run Beckside Yarns & Needlecrafts in Clapham.

Sandra commented: “When I heard that Glencroft was launching a limited-edition Yorkshire hand-knit yarn, it was incredibly exciting and I was delighted to be asked to test it. It knits like any other DK weight yarn and I was pleasantly surprised by its softness and the good level of tension. I’ll definitely be getting my hands on some more!”

 

Sandra, who has designed her own patterns for many years, has donated several knitting patterns which she used to test the Clapdale yarn with to Glencroft, which are now available to download for free online.

UNIQUE DESIGN: Free scarf and hat patterns donated by Sandra Oakeshott available at glencroft.co.uk

The 100g hanks of hand knit Clapdale Wool retail at £15.95 and are available to buy in-store at Glencroft’s shop in Clapham, as well as at a variety of local retailers and online at glencroft.co.uk.

 

Concluding, Edward said: “We wanted to show how it is possible to ensure that farmers get a fair price for their fleeces, as well as creating a circular economy by giving 10% of all profits from the finished yarn and products back to them. We also wanted to work with and promote the breeds on our doorstep regardless of what they were and explain the processes and costs to consumers so they can buy an authentic, traceable product that will stand the test of time.”

 

Now that their ‘farm to yarn’ pilot has been completed successfully, Glencroft hopes to further develop and commercialise their Clapdale Wool over the coming years, working with British Wool.

 

 

Follow Glencroft on Twitter at @GlencroftUK, Instagram at glencroftuk and Facebook at @GlencroftUK.

 

Notes 

 

Based in a 200-year-old converted barn in the conservation village of Clapham in the Yorkshire Dales National Park, Glencroft Countrywear produces traditional, luxury clothing made from natural fibres including British wool, sheepskin and Harris Tweed.

 

Established in 1987 by Richard & Justina Sexton, the company has supplied national and international retailers, from small independents to large online and mail order firms, for over 30 years. In 2018, the firm launched a consumer retail division, with a new website where consumers could buy direct.

 

The business is focused on producing exceptional products inspired by the rural life and stunning Yorkshire scenery that surrounds them – all from an ethically sourced supply chain, over 80% of which is still made in the UK. The rest is sourced from trusted partners in Europe, including Portugal.

 

Their range of knitwear, hats, slippers, gloves, sheepskin rugs, throws and other accessories combines both classic and contemporary designs to create luxurious products for men, women and children.

 

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